April112013

After a long week, the exhibit is installed and set to open tomorrow night! 7 PM at the Tarble Arts Center at Eastern Illinois University

April62013
Battle of Lookout Mountain, painted by artist James Walker ca. November 1863
This painting is the piece that Walker was working on in the photograph Walker the Artist and Theodore Davis at Work on Lookout Mountain, which was posted about previously on this blog. A digital reproduction of this painting will be exhibited side-by-side with the photograph.

Battle of Lookout Mountain, painted by artist James Walker ca. November 1863

This painting is the piece that Walker was working on in the photograph Walker the Artist and Theodore Davis at Work on Lookout Mountain, which was posted about previously on this blog. A digital reproduction of this painting will be exhibited side-by-side with the photograph.

April32013
Cane carved by Robert S. Patent, on loan from the Illinois State Military Museum
Patent, a soldier in the 114th Illinois Infantry, carved this cane while incarcerated in the Andersonville prison camp in Georgia, and will be on display on our exhibit

Cane carved by Robert S. Patent, on loan from the Illinois State Military Museum

Patent, a soldier in the 114th Illinois Infantry, carved this cane while incarcerated in the Andersonville prison camp in Georgia, and will be on display on our exhibit

April12013
This is a drawing by Frederick Ransom, an Illinois soldier who drew several depictions of his experiences in the years following the conflict. This particular image is a drawing of the Battle of Shiloh, which took place in Tennessee on April 6-7, 1862. Several other digital productions of Ransom drawings are on display in our exhibit, on loan from the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum.

This is a drawing by Frederick Ransom, an Illinois soldier who drew several depictions of his experiences in the years following the conflict. This particular image is a drawing of the Battle of Shiloh, which took place in Tennessee on April 6-7, 1862. Several other digital productions of Ransom drawings are on display in our exhibit, on loan from the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum.

March242013
thecivilwarparlor:

“Angel of the Battlefield”: Sister Anthony O’Connell-On the battlefields and in the hospitals, soldiers on both sides of the Civil War owed their consolation, or their very lives, to the Catholic Nun. They were there on the war’s bloodiest battlefields. At Shiloh, where some 25,000 fell.
As posted by  patmcnamara 
Sister Anthony was a native of Limerick, Ireland..“To the soldiers of both armies,”  “her name had a magic ring of wonderful power. To them she was the incarnation of angelic goodness that seemed like a visitation from realms celestial. On the battlefield of Shiloh, amid a veritable ocean of blood, she performed the most revolting duties to these poor soldiers. Neither the cries of anguish of the dying nor the unbearable stench from dead bodies could check her in her ministrations. To the young soldier that lay, fatally wounded, upon that bloody ground and was thinking of a lone mother at home, Sister Anthony brought the comfort and peace of a mother’s care. In such moments, it was the instinct of the woman in her that enabled her to soothe the aching heart while relieving the pangs of physical suffering. Otto Juettner, Daniel Drake (Cincinnati, 1909)
http://www.patheos.com/Resources/Additional-Resources/Catholic-Sisters-and-the-American-Civil-War-Pat-McNamara-05-31-2011.html

Shiloh was one of the bloodiest battles of the war, and Illinois soldiers accounted for more than a third of the Union casualties in the fight. 

thecivilwarparlor:

“Angel of the Battlefield”: Sister Anthony O’Connell-On the battlefields and in the hospitals, soldiers on both sides of the Civil War owed their consolation, or their very lives, to the Catholic Nun. They were there on the war’s bloodiest battlefields. At Shiloh, where some 25,000 fell.

As posted by   

Sister Anthony was a native of Limerick, Ireland..“To the soldiers of both armies,”  “her name had a magic ring of wonderful power. To them she was the incarnation of angelic goodness that seemed like a visitation from realms celestial. On the battlefield of Shiloh, amid a veritable ocean of blood, she performed the most revolting duties to these poor soldiers. Neither the cries of anguish of the dying nor the unbearable stench from dead bodies could check her in her ministrations. To the young soldier that lay, fatally wounded, upon that bloody ground and was thinking of a lone mother at home, Sister Anthony brought the comfort and peace of a mother’s care. In such moments, it was the instinct of the woman in her that enabled her to soothe the aching heart while relieving the pangs of physical suffering. Otto Juettner, Daniel Drake (Cincinnati, 1909)

http://www.patheos.com/Resources/Additional-Resources/Catholic-Sisters-and-the-American-Civil-War-Pat-McNamara-05-31-2011.html

Shiloh was one of the bloodiest battles of the war, and Illinois soldiers accounted for more than a third of the Union casualties in the fight. 

March202013
A Harper’s Weekly page illustrated by Thomas Nast, criticizing the platform of democratic presidential candidate General George B. McClellan, running on a ticket based on the ending of hostilities with the south in 1864. The Democratic National Convention was held that year in Chicago.

A Harper’s Weekly page illustrated by Thomas Nast, criticizing the platform of democratic presidential candidate General George B. McClellan, running on a ticket based on the ending of hostilities with the south in 1864. The Democratic National Convention was held that year in Chicago.

March52013
March32013
A Harper’s Weekly drawing of the chaos of a field hospital. By today’s standards, the conditions and medical treatment that soldiers received on the field was appalling—disease was rampant, and basic antiseptic treatment was still an unknown. As the caption on the image states, only a third of Union deaths during the civil war came from wounds—disease took the rest.

A Harper’s Weekly drawing of the chaos of a field hospital. By today’s standards, the conditions and medical treatment that soldiers received on the field was appalling—disease was rampant, and basic antiseptic treatment was still an unknown. As the caption on the image states, only a third of Union deaths during the civil war came from wounds—disease took the rest.

March22013
A Harper’s Weekly engraving of volunteers from Dubuque, IA being mustered to Cairo, IL at the beginning of the war.
While no battles took place in Illinois, Cairo was a major staging ground and supply depot in the western theatre of the civil war, situated at the strategic convergence of the Ohio and Mississippi rivers.

A Harper’s Weekly engraving of volunteers from Dubuque, IA being mustered to Cairo, IL at the beginning of the war.

While no battles took place in Illinois, Cairo was a major staging ground and supply depot in the western theatre of the civil war, situated at the strategic convergence of the Ohio and Mississippi rivers.

February232013
thecivilwarparlor:

Frances Hook a Female Soldier who Fought in Major Battles at Fort Henry, Fort Donelson and Shiloh aka “Frank Miller” &  ”Frank Henderson”
Frances and her brother decided to enlist for the Union Army when the Civil War started. She lied about her age, and cut her hair. They joined the 11th Illinois Infantry Regiment. Frances’ brother was killed in the battle of Shiloh. 
Soldier Frances Hook who as Private Frank Miller, 90th Illinois (not confirmed on rolls) was wounded in the thigh and captured near Florence, Alabama in early 1864 and incarcerated at Atlanta. A Confederate doctor tending to Union wounded exposed Frank Miller as a female and she was soon exchanged at Graysville, Georgia on February 17, 1864 and subsequently convalesced in Nashville where this likeness was taken.
She was taken prisoner by Confederate troops while walking along a trail while her regiment was awaiting deployment. She attempted to make a daring escape, but was shot, and again imprisoned. The Confederates were impressed with her courage, and offered her commission to join their side. She told them that she would rather be hanged then to fight along side the Confederate troops.
Later she was discharged and sent home to Illinois but speculation remains that with nowhere else to go she reenlisted and continued to serve until the end of the war.
Frances Hook ultimately married in 1908, and her daughter later applied for a military pension based on her mother’s Civil War military service. Contemporary authors of social history and those focusing in women’s studies have put the number of female soldiers serving in Northern and Southern armies as high as several thousand, but the true identities of only a handful are actually known. Frances Hook alias Frank Miller is a legitimate example of a female warrior.
Price Realized: $3,105.00 at Cowan’s Auctions http://www.cowanauctions.com/auctions/item.aspx?ItemId=36196

An interesting story of an Illinois woman who enlisted to fight for the Union Cause—

thecivilwarparlor:

Frances Hook a Female Soldier who Fought in Major Battles at Fort Henry, Fort Donelson and Shiloh aka “Frank Miller” &  ”Frank Henderson”

Frances and her brother decided to enlist for the Union Army when the Civil War started. She lied about her age, and cut her hair. They joined the 11th Illinois Infantry Regiment. Frances’ brother was killed in the battle of Shiloh. 

Soldier Frances Hook who as Private Frank Miller, 90th Illinois (not confirmed on rolls) was wounded in the thigh and captured near Florence, Alabama in early 1864 and incarcerated at Atlanta. A Confederate doctor tending to Union wounded exposed Frank Miller as a female and she was soon exchanged at Graysville, Georgia on February 17, 1864 and subsequently convalesced in Nashville where this likeness was taken.

She was taken prisoner by Confederate troops while walking along a trail while her regiment was awaiting deployment. She attempted to make a daring escape, but was shot, and again imprisoned. The Confederates were impressed with her courage, and offered her commission to join their side. She told them that she would rather be hanged then to fight along side the Confederate troops.

Later she was discharged and sent home to Illinois but speculation remains that with nowhere else to go she reenlisted and continued to serve until the end of the war.

Frances Hook ultimately married in 1908, and her daughter later applied for a military pension based on her mother’s Civil War military service. Contemporary authors of social history and those focusing in women’s studies have put the number of female soldiers serving in Northern and Southern armies as high as several thousand, but the true identities of only a handful are actually known. Frances Hook alias Frank Miller is a legitimate example of a female warrior.

Price Realized: $3,105.00 at Cowan’s Auctions http://www.cowanauctions.com/auctions/item.aspx?ItemId=36196

An interesting story of an Illinois woman who enlisted to fight for the Union Cause—

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